STREET LIFE | ON THE WALL WITH CRANIO’S SIMPSONS IN SAO PAULO, BRASIL

March 12, 2014  |  Animation, art, Graffiti, Street Art, Streets  |  Comments Off

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Beautiful new piece in Sao Paulo, Brasil from street artist CRANIO (aka: Fabio Oliveira), imagining the Simpsons as Amazonian natives...

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FILM | TSUNEO GODA + SADE RELEASE ANIMATED SHORT FILM “BY YOUR SIDE” TO BENEFIT THE CHILDREN OF JAPAN’S GREAT EARTHQUAKE

March 11, 2014  |  Animation, art, Film, Japan  |  Comments Off

By Your Side - Sade & Goda Tsuneo/dwarf, the studio behind Domo-kun from Zapuni on Vimeo.

In an attempt to raise awareness of the needs of Japanese children who have been traumatised by the devastating impact of the Great Eastern Japan earthquake of 2011, the creatives at Zapuni today released the new animated short film “By Your Side” on the third anniversary of the earthquake. Two years in the making, musician Sade, animator Tsuneo Goda, and filmmakers Dwarf and Gregory Rood came up with this little gem to express a feeling of love and solidarity with the affected children of this natural disaster. Watch now and support at Zapuni.com Read More

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FILM///MUST READ: THE TRUE STORY OF THE WOMEN WHO ANIMATED THE GOLDEN AGE OF DISNEY

February 11, 2010  |  Animation, art, News  |  Comments Off

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Fascinating article in the March 2010 issue of VANITY FAIR revealing the true story of the army of young women who inked and painted all the animation of DISNEY's Golden Age:

COLORING THE KINGDOM
By Patricia Zohn | Vanity Fair
Behind the breakthrough magic of Walt Disney’s first animated feature, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, and his other 30s and 40s classics—Pinocchio, Fantasia, Bambi—toiled as many as 100 young women, the inkers and painters, working from dawn to dusk on thousands of cels that brought his dreams to life. The author recaptures their white-gloved esprit de corps, and a golden age of Disney that would be disrupted by strike, World War II, and, eventually, the Xerox machine.

"Snow White has to be out by Christmas—if not it’ll be too bad for Disney’s,” 20-year-old platinum blonde Reidun “Rae” Medby wrote her boyfriend from her Hollywood apartment late one night in the fall of 1937. She was barely able to keep her eyes open after a month of working weekends and double shifts in the Ink and Paint department, the all-female “finishing school” of hand-drawn animation, during the final push on the groundbreaking film. “The minute I get a pen in my hand my brain goes numb—just like it does at the studio. Don’t be upset if I start inking ducks and mice.”

The Mickey Mouse and Donald Duck color short films that had lured Rae to the jumbled Hyperion Avenue studio had grown ever more expensive—even a “mathemagician” like Walt’s brother Roy couldn’t shrink the six months of preparation, the thousands of cels (the celluloid sheets on which drawings were traced and colored before being photographed), or the two-week shoots they required. More tellingly, the films no longer reflected Walt’s ambitions for the rapidly evolving medium. Now everything was hanging on the production of the world’s first animated feature, about a pretty, ragtag princess and her seven bachelor heroes. Yet Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, as Walt conceived it (and reconceived it, right up until its release), was based on the daring notion that a fairy-tale cartoon could hold an audience’s attention for more than an hour. It was proving to be a singularly labor-and-money-intensive crusade.

The end of the assembly line usually inherits all the problems. Preparing the animators’ vision for camera required the inking and painting of thousands of fragile, combustible cels with perfect refinement. During Snow White, it was not at all unusual to see the “girls”—as Walt paternalistically referred to them—thin and exhausted, collapsed on the lawn, in the ladies’ lounge, or even under their desks. “I’ll be so thankful when Snow White is finished and I can live like a human once again,” Rae wrote after she recorded 85 hours in a week. “We would work like little slaves and everybody would go to sleep wherever they were,” said inker Jeanne Lee Keil, one of two left-handers in the department who had to learn everything backward. “I saw the moon rise, sun rise, moon rise, sun rise.” Painter Grace Godino, who would go on to become Rita Hayworth’s studio double, also remembered the long days merging into nights: “When I’d take my clothes off, I’d be in the closet, and I couldn’t figure it out: am I going to sleep or am I getting up?” Click HERE to continue reading...

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ANIMATRIX///NEWS///JAMES JARVIS PUSHES “ONWARDS” FOR NIKE

April 26, 2009  |  Animation, art, News, Video  |  Comments Off


Onwards from AKQA on Vimeo.

Running obsessed British illustrator, artist, and toy junkie JAMES JARVIS brings his passion for "runner's high" and the moving line together in this amazing animation for NIKE. Now if only a network would grow a pair and sign him to a full-length series...

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SOUNDS///ANIMATRIX///DAVID LYNCH ANIMATES MOBY’S “SHOT IN THE BACK OF THE HEAD”

April 17, 2009  |  Animation, News, Sounds, Video  |  Comments Off


Shot In The Back Of The Head from Moby on Vimeo.

Favorite Supertouch weirdo genius DAVID LYNCH has just animated the song "Shot in the Back of the Head" from MOBY's forthcoming album "Wait for Me." Download the song for free HERE...

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NEWS///ANIMATIRX///SOUTH PARK DOES SHEPARD FAIREY

March 20, 2009  |  Animation, art, Graffiti, News, Obama, Shepard Fairey, Street Art, WTF???  |  Comments Off

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It was only a matter of time, Supertouch's own SHEPARD FAIREY's iconic OBAMA campaign artwork finally made its way to SOUTH PARK last nite where the Big O received the typical Matt & Tre makeover on the season's latest episode. Watch it HERE...

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SOUND & VISION///MR. ANDRE GETS ANIMATED FOR CAZALS’ “SOMEBODY SOMEWHERE” VIDEO

December 16, 2008  |  Animation, Graffiti, News, Paris, Street Art, Video  |  Comments Off

Notorious Parisian party boy street artist MR. ANDRE brings his trademark daddy-longlegged pink stickman to life for UK dance rockers CAZALS' new video for "Somebody Somewhere" and the results are nothing short of impressive. Let's just hope Banksy's rats stay put on their walls...

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FILM///FIRST LOOK: ASTRO BOY THE MOVIE

December 3, 2008  |  Animation, Film, First Look, Icons & Legends, Japan, News, Otaku  |  Comments Off

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A curiously shirted Astro Boy runs out to kick Speed Racer's ass...

2009 is gonna be a huge year for otaku Anime & Manga fans when the legendary ASTRO BOY finally hits the big screen in modern computer animated form in an eponymous feature based the highly successful Japanese franchise by OSAMU TEZUKA. Nicolas Cage's inclusion in the film as voice "talent" will surely be a low point but hopefully they don't mess this flick up completely. We need something to redeem last year's "Speed Racer" fiasco bad...

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LA///NEWS///MURAKAMI TO OPEN HOLLYWOOD ANIMATION STUDIO

November 26, 2008  |  Animation, art, Art & Commerce, LA, Murakami, News  |  Comments Off

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Murakami shows what it takes to get a studio opened in Hollywood (photo by Don C)...

Japan’s Warhol, aka: TAKASHI MURAKAMI, is now poised to become the country’s modern version of Walt Disney after news this week that he’s poised to set up a new animation studio in LA in summer 2009. Operating under the umbrella of KAI KAI KIKI, his artist management & personal production company, the studio will be located on North Highland Ave in close proximity to the nexus of Hollywood studio activity. Having proved his studio’s formidable animation chops with the Kai Kai Kiki-produced video for Kanye West’s “Good Morning,” and the “Superflat Monogram” short for Louis Vuitton, the company’s first pursuit will be the expansion of Murakami’s playfully fecal-friendly "Planting the Seeds” shorts starring his signature characters Kai Kai and Kiki that debuted at his “© Murakami” show in LA and Brooklyn last year into a feature-length film. Said Murakami about his new move into cartoons, "Animation and film have always been among my greatest influences, ever since I first saw 'Star Wars' and Hayao Miyazaki's films. This studio represents a great step in the evolution of Kai Kai Kiki and gives me a closer proximity to the community of artists with whom I hope to collaborate as I continue my explorations of animated and live-action film."

KANYE WEST “GOOD MORNING”:


“SUPERFLAT MONOGRAM” FOR LOUIS VUITTON:



“PLANTING THE SEEDS” TEASER:

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ANIMATRIX///THE SIMPSONS x MAD MEN

October 29, 2008  |  Animation, News, Video  |  Comments Off

From this year's upcoming "Treehouse of Horrors" Halloween special...

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